PARALLEL SESSIONS

On top of several high-quality keynote sessions, the Raw Materials Summit 2019 offers a number of technical Parallel Sessions, i.e., small technical workshops with strong focus on innovation. Five to six invited speakers will be presenting innovative technologies, trends and results, showcasing the latest achievements in Europe and beyond, as well as results of ongoing projects of the EIT RawMaterials. The topics of the sessions are chosen to cover the most pressing technological and industrial challenges facing the raw materials sector and having an impact on the entire value chain. The content of the session is designed to cover in a balanced fashion both the six thematic areas characterizing the KIC Raw Materials, as well as the strategic Lighthouse Programme launched by our Community.

Resources: Discovery and Beyond

Resources assessment and availability, innovative exploration technologies

Day 1 - 20 May 2019 - from 15:30 to 18:00 - Room Aquamarin

Europe utilizes more than 20% of the world’s primary production of metals and minerals, but it only produces 2–3% of this amount. The continent presents and holds potential for future exploitation of available mineral resources, with opportunities for renewed, modern and juvenile exploration. Still, only 1.4% of the global exploration budget is devoted to projects in Europe. More discoveries, acceptable in terms of environmental and social impact through e.g., better engagement of communities, are needed to establish a sustainable raw material supply in Europe.

New innovative and improved technologies are needed to achieve deeper penetration, improved resolution, comprehensive characterisation of new physical parameters, improved models, ease of acquisition at lowered costs and improved data analysis and visualisation to assist fast interpretation and decision-making. 

The session will provide an overview of the latest developments in exploration and primary resources assessment. Technologies enabling simultaneous measurement while drilling, to characterize in real-time or near-real time rock composition and non-invasive deep exploration methodologies will be showcased. The utilization of big data and the latest development in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to help gain suitable information to increase the chance to find exploitable ore deposits will also be shown, with application to specific cases.

Murray Hitzman, CEO, Director, Irish Centre for Research in Applied Geosciences

Minerals: Europe IS the Future

[read abstract]

Abstract

Europe is a hub of raw materials activity.  Not only is the EU a major consumer of raw materials, EU countries produce significant amounts of mineral raw materials and recent discoveries underline the potential for additional world-class discoveries, including those of critical minerals.  Europe is the home to a number of major mining and mineral production companies as well as a significant number of mining equipment companies.  Research on raw materials through European academic institutions is growing with the development of highly innovative solutions to the production of raw materials from both primary and secondary sources.  Innovation sparked by EIT Raw Materials programmes amongst its many industry and academic partners will ensure that Europe remains a major force in this sector.

Massimo Gasparon, EIT RawMaterials

Lighthouse Sustainable Discovery and Supply

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Abstract

Discovery is the initial feeding of the raw materials value chain and the lifeblood of our modern society. To face the challenge of increasing demand for raw materials combined with high import dependency, Europe must react and reverse the trend of a decaying raw materials sector to address strategic issues such as criticality, global supply and sustainable economic development (Figure 1). In this context, the Lighthouse Sustainable Discovery and Supply acts as a broker for innovation, technological advancement, knowledge and entrepreneurial spirit in exploration, mining and processing. Moreover, the Lighthouse aims to be a beacon for trustworthy and transparent social engagement to emphasize the benefits of a strong raw materials sector in Europe with a Social License to Operate. Its main goals are:

 

(1) unlocking the potential for a renewed raw materials sector

(2) creating value for all stakeholders and the wider public through positive social engagement

(3) providing clear guidance and fostering innovation and entrepreneurial talent

(4) creating, transferring and applying knowledge and driving the application of research outcomes through to industry engagement

(5) boosting European investments in the raw materials sector

(6) taking responsibility to reduce the footprint of the raw materials sector

 

To revitalize the European raw materials sector, the Lighthouse Sustainable Discovery and Supply aims to unlock existing potentials and develop new pathways through innovation and via effective engagement of civil society, legislation, research and industry. Knowledge and technology transfer and the establishment of investments, new markets and search spaces for the identification and production of both primary and secondary resources are hereby key instruments.

The Lighthouse Sustainable Discovery and Supply aims to boost Europe’s exploration, mining and processing activity to develop a strong and diverse European raw materials sector in accordance with the UN Sustainable Development Goals and under a Social License to Operate to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all.

Bo Stensgaard (Blue Jay Mining), Stefan Bernstein (GEUS)

Future exploration technologies in harsh underexplored arctic environment

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Abstract

The harsh, remote and inaccessible Arctic, is underexplored, and thus holds an opportunity for future supply of resources. The Arctic poses challenges and demands of technologies and logistical approaches being applied to identify and develop such resources.
The short seasons, vulnerable environment and risks in the Arctic request that technologies are safe, dependable and easy deployable. Also, the expensive and short-season field campaigns imply that technologies must be efficient and trustworthy and, preferable, produced near-real time or minimal turn-around time results for fast follow-up. Since cost of drilling in Arctic often is much more expensive than in competing areas, even more emphasis is needed on the integration of geoscience data and development of robust exploration strategy prior to model-test by drilling. Offsetting this is the often well exposed geology that generally extends the quality of the geological model and interpretation beyond what can be obtained in other areas where cover and vegetation hamper direct observations.
In a dynamic and fast-moving financial and commodity market, the ability of technologies to deliver results and new flow faster and timely is vital. All this is governed by an underlying demand for delivering sustainable impacts on society. The presentation will focus on the trends and needs for future exploration technologies and approaches applied in Arctic; under a motto ‘if it works under these conditions, it will work everywhere’.

Richard Gloaguen, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

You can look but you can’t touch – non-invasive exploration in Europe (and beyond)

[read abstract]

Abstract

There is a growing demand for mineral resources worldwide, and yet industry is facing increasing obstacles in obtaining public acceptance for new exploration and mining projects. Numerous recent citizen protests highlight the bad public perception of mining projects and increase the reluctance of investors to finance explorations. These difficulties will certainly increase as sensitive areas such as the Arctic or deep-sea environments are now considered. We argue that a paradigm shift is needed to improve the reputation of the industry and increase the acceptance of exploration and mining. Respect and inclusion of host communities should be at the forefront at the earliest stages of exploration. Non-invasive exploration techniques can be defined as energy efficient, low-impact technologies. They assist in the detection and mapping of mineral deposits and improve exploration targeting with minimal environmental impact, while demonstrating that industry cares about reducing disturbance to the communities and environment in which they operate. Until recently, these criteria have generally not figured significantly in mineral exploration design and planning in Europe. However, it is increasingly understood that non-invasive technologies can help to maintain the social licence to operate and consequently lower the investment risk of exploration. To demonstrate this premise, we established the EU-funded research project INFACT (Innovative, Non-Invasive and Fully Acceptable Exploration Technologies), which supports the development of innovative exploration and stakeholder engagement approaches. Our project will establish a set of permanent, accessible reference sites to trial and assess the technological and social performance of existing and emerging innovative, non-invasive exploration techniques (e.g., SQUID magnetics, muon tomography, gravity gradiometry, passive seismics, airborne long-wave hyperspectral imaging, UAV magnetics). The reference sites have a rich and diverse exploration portfolio including extensive drillhole databases and cover a broad range of geological, social and climatic conditions to cater for a wide variety of future users. We will assess both the technical merits of the methods and the opinions of local stakeholders. Ultimately, INFACT will result in a credible certification scheme for best practice mineral exploration which, it is hoped, will provide comfort and confidence to exploration decision makers, investors and civil society. Such schemes for the metal and mining industries are just emerging but will help to establish new approaches in reducing environmental impact and increasing social acceptance, thus boosting the sector in Europe.

Maria Jose Jurado, CSIC

Taking innovation to the subsurface: in situ mineral evaluation with innovative geophysical logging tools for mineral exploration (INNOLOG project)

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Abstract

Improving the efficiency and diagnostic capacity of existing exploration borehole inspection methods is a challenge for innovation. The development of new tools suitable to improve mining exploration efficiency and sustainability is one of the main objectives of the INNOLOG project (http://innolog.eitrawmaterials.eu). New borehole logging tools are being implemented making use of hyperspectral cameras and laser spectroscopy techniques, suitable for efficient mineral in situ evaluation and mineral composition assessment directly inside exploration boreholes. After successful assemblage and integration of components of the borehole logging tools, successful testing of prototypes performance (tools and software) was carried out. The results obtained indicate that mineral mapping and grade estimation directly inside boreholes can be performed with INNOLOG downhole logging tools and also the interpretation software developed (based on machine learning methods). First tests were carried out at scientific boreholes (research facilities at ICTJA-CSIC) and also in exploration boreholes in mines and mining areas. The results obtained indicate that mineral mapping and grade estimation directly inside boreholes can be performed with INNOLOG downhole logging tools.The full functionality of INNOLOG tools will be 3D hyperspectral imaging of the borehole walls along with accurate compositional profiles obtained from laser based (LIPS/Raman) spectroscopy.

 
 
Minerals Processing and Materials Recycling

Increasing resource, energy and water efficiency during raw materials beneficiation

Day 1 - 20 May 2019 - from 15:30 to 18:00 - Room Rubin

Mineral processing technologies during raw materials beneficiation need to be adapted to the challenge of increasingly complex primary and secondary input materials. For Secondary resources, there are numerous potential target metals to be recovered, but only few of them will lead to profitable returns. As products get more complex with lower concentrations of target metals, the need for more efficient recovery of these compounds increases. Higher recovery yield needs to be combined with water and energy efficiency in order to meet both competitive cost and a reduced environmental impact. At the same time, the valorisation of wastes downstream the processing plant is one of the viable route if we wish to realize the circular economy principles within the minerals processing industry. The session will provide an overview of developments in different areas, including waste-to-products transformations, innovative metallurgical processes, innovative water management methodologies, low impact processing of minerals as well as control and optimisation of algorithms to increase energy efficiency.

Peter Hayes, The University of Queensland

Current Challenges in Metallurgical Engineering

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Abstract

The world is in the midst of rapid economic, political and technological changes. These create challenges for the metallurgical processing in terms of Future Metal Supply, Technological Innovation, and Opportunities and Strategies for Future Development. The talk will highlight and briefly explore these three issues.The world is in the midst of rapid economic, political and technological changes. These create challenges for the metallurgical processing in terms of Future Metal Supply, Technological Innovation, and Opportunities and Strategies for Future Development. The talk will highlight and briefly explore these three issues.

Jean-Michel Milazzo, ERAMET Research

Go40 project: From iron and manganese oxides waste to valuable metal alloys using novel carbon sources materials

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Abstract

The metal industry is facing ever stringent environmental regulations leading to more and more efficient off-gas systems. These new off-gas systems generate additional by-products in the form of dusts and sludge. At the same time, the quality and scarcity of raw materials is becoming a real issue and metal producers have to maximize their resource efficiency in order to maintain their competitiveness. Therefore, a cross-sectoral consortium has been built in the frame of an EIT Raw Materials project “Go-4-0”. Its objective is to agglomerate by-products from different sectors in view of their recycling in the production of FeMn alloys . The Go-4-0 project is focused on market specifications (product, use, value) and on the technological and economic viability of the proposed recycling chain. Each step of the Go-4-0 project aims at minimizing the importance of OPEX and CAPEX for the innovative industrialization solution that will be found out. In 2016, a first market study was performed to define the best mix in terms of economic value versus process feasibility. 
Laboratories results have been carried out. Several binders have been tested and optimized in order to minimize the cost of cold pre-processing while providing the required mechanical properties. Several tests have been compared in order to determine the best recycling route. The final feasibility assessment will be done in 2019 during a semi-industrial campaign using a 600 kW Smelting Arc Furnace. 

Christian Binder, OUTOTEC

MONICALC – Kaolin calcination with variable energy input – results of an EIT RM funded project

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Abstract

In this project, the innovative integrated solution is based on feed type characterization by online analysis including control and optimization algorithms across the whole production chain. In addition, a flexible energy delivery system based on renewable energy resources resulted into an optimized and automated process which can be today offered as a coupled fluidized bed gasification and calcination process. This increases process efficiency and decreases energy consumption and with it, the CO2 emissions in kaolin calcination. The products and concepts developed as part of the project can be adapted to process other minerals as well.

Paivi Kinnunen, VTT

METGROW+ Metal Recovery from Low Grade Ores and Wastes

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Abstract

METGROW+ creates and validates an industrially viable, flexible New Metallurgical Systems Toolbox, which allows to smartly combine pyro-, hydro-, electro-, bio-, solvo and ionometallurgical unit operations, as well as residual matrix valorisation technologies, for the valorisation of EU’s low-grade, polymetallic primary and secondary resources.

Phil Newmann, Anglo American

The ITERAMS project

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Abstract

The ITERAMS ambition is to create a paradigm shift in water resource and tailings management to deliver sustainable mining. ITERAMS uses sulphidic ores as the framework for concept development. The plant is isolated from the surrounding water systems and all water is recycled. Tailings are deposited filter dry.
The closed water circuit results in a complex system, where different process steps and technologies have diverse and interconnected effects on the operations. Complete closure of water loops increases thermodynamic and kinetic instability and process disturbance. Residence time of water storage before re-use is reduced leaving water in a kinetically controlled thermodynamic unbalance. Furthermore, water circulation tends to raise temperature, which could generate bacterial growth. ITERAMS creates capabilities and different tools via laboratory experiments, modelling and validation at mine sites to tackle this complexity.

Darina Styriaková, Ekolive

Ecological refining of mineral raw materials as an on-site service

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

Low quality of local mineral deposits is caused by metallic impurities that dramatically reduce its value and usability. ekolive provides metals removal by bioleaching with zero waste economy without restriction for volume of processed raw materials (RM). Bioleaching is an alternative way of metal extraction and improving raw materials. This effective, economical and environmentally friendly innovative method enables the utilisation of local sources for high-quality demanding end-users. 
ekolive's solution:

 •Increases resource efficiency in mineral and metallurgical processes
•Secures sustainable RM supply
•Designs solutions and closing material loops by quality enhancement of mineral raw materials
•Turns non-economic regional local deposits (including tailings) into profitable ones
•Increases the development of the local industry

Impact on the EIT RMs' value chain is on the edge between upscaling and processing, between “Mines for Modern Society-Innovative technologies for intelligent and sustainable mining” and “Develop and improve Processing-Resource efficiency and safety in mineral and metallurgical processes”. This technology and service respond to Europe's challenge in securing RM in a sustainable way due to high reliance on imports, increasing consumption and decreasing quality and availability of resources, but also for new processes and technologies in processing that can potentially reshape the idea of what a resource is and secure supplies of RM for the future.

 
 
Resource Efficiency in Cities

Urban and landfill mining, materials flow analysis, circular economy

Day 1 - 20 May 2019 - from 15:30 to 18:00 - Room Turmalin

Forecast by the United Nations estimate that by 2030 about 5 billion people will live in cities, and by 2050 two thirds of the global population will live in urban areas. As the attractiveness of cities as places of opportunity for a higher quality of life increases, so does also the materials intensity connected to the population increase in urban areas. Materials flows optimisation in cities is crucial to aim for the shift from a linear to a circular economy model. A concerted use of policies, social innovation, new business models, education, new design approaches and technologies is the key to achieve resource efficiency in cities.

The session will provide an overview of challenges to be addressed to increase resource efficiency in cities. Moreover, it will be shown how policies, education, innovation and technologies can facilitate the efficient recovery of valuable materials, for example in consumers electronics products.

Nikolai Jacobi, ICLEI

From cascadic use to green infrastructure - An urban perspective to circular development

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Abstract

Cities take-up a manifold role in developing a circular economy: as platform, curator and investor. In this, it is crucial to understand the societal functions of urban material- and energy flows to inform policies that are socio-ecologically centered. This contribution outlines an approach to urban circular development and provides good examples.

Prof. Markus Reuter, HZDR

Process metallurgy and systems in circular city design – the challenges

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

Realising the circular economy is faced with some significant challenges. Process metallurgy and its infrastructure play key roles at the heart of making the circular economy work. The enabling role of process metallurgy within the circular economy and circular cities will be discussed, touching also on product and system design.

Yiannis Pontikes, KU Leuven

RECOVER: an example of a KIC project on the use of industrial residues for novel building materials

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

RECOVER works on the upscaling of processes for the development of construction materials from metallurgical by-products. Four modular and mobile upscaling units, incorporating all equipment necessary in 20 ft. engineered containers, are being build and will be moving to various industrial sites to produce construction materials, in particular thermal insulating building blocks, fire-resistant tiles and cement-like binders, on site. This is expected to lead to trust build-up among the different shareholders, encourage industrial symbiosis among industries and eventually accelerate growth to higher technology readiness level. This will ultimately allow for the market uptake of the developed products.

Martin Schlummer, Fraunhofer

Recycling of display appliances

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

DISPLAY is a EIT raw material upscaling project and aims at the recovery of valuable raw materials from end of life display devices and printed circuit boards. State of the art recycling is currently performed in smelting processes as the devices are too small for manual recycling methods or my cause safety issues in shredder based technologies due to enclosed Li ion batteries. Through a novel combination of separation techniques including electrohydraulic fragmentation (EHF) and automated sorting it is possible to separate display appliances into different fractions like displays, batteries and metals. These fractions are then processed by further downstream recycling technologies. In addition a polymer rich fraction is generated and treated with the CreaSolv® Process, which is a solvent based recycling process for mixed polymer waste capable of recovering pure polymers from mixed plastic waste. By this process we successfully recover high quality PC/ABS from end of life display devices. 
Establishing of suitable process chains is supported by business models to ensure both, technical and economic feasibility. However, sourcing of waste display appliances is a main issue of the DISPLAY project, as these appliances are often supplied in the second hand market or wasted outside official collection schemes of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE).

Miha Zakotnik, Urban Mining Company

The Future of Waste NdFeB Rare Earth Permanent Magnets and their Role in a Circular Economy

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

There is a global increase in demand for NdFeB magnets, and therefore for rare earths. This puts additional stress in their available supply chain, as we are also moving towards a more circular and greener economy.
Implemented by UMC, magnet-to-magnet (M2M®) recycling and grain boundary engineering (GBE®) processes have been scaled-up and expand technical limitations of traditional sintered neo manufacturing. These processes have measurable impact on the environment and address practicability when it comes to implementation in real life. Currently, UMC’s magnet reuse process is gaining attention and is regarded as an alternative production route for the manufacture of either fully dense sintered NdFeB magnets or bonded NdFeB magnets. 
To manufacture recycled NdFeB magnets via the M2M® process, using end-of-life ('waste') NdFeB as a feedstock material, is challenging. By using a unique processing route, recycled magnets are up-cycled to new magnets with increased magnetic performance and microstructures. This was demonstrated when comparing two nearly identical electric motors, one containing recycled NdFeB magnets produced via the magnet-to-magnet processing, and the other containing conventional NdFeB magnets made from virgin elements. UMC has demonstrated the viability of the NdFeB magnet-to-magnet recycling and reusing technology in real world applications on a mass production scale.

Materials for Future Mobility

Challenges and solutions for raw materials and advanced materials for future mobility

Day 1 - 20 May 2019 - from 15:30 to 18:00 - Auditorium

The mobility revolution has a significant impact on the extraction, processing, use, and recycling of materials. In fact, the transition to a sustainable mobility is enabled by new concepts and smart material use, that is, primarily for the vehicles’ structural parts, the powertrain as well as for advanced communication technologies (autonomous driving). 
The session provides specific examples of key raw materials and advanced materials challenges and solutions in the shift to electrification and lightweight design with the ultimate goal to approach a cost efficient and sustainable zero emission mobility. In a first part, the presentations focus on composites and aluminium alloys as alternative lightweight materials in mobility applications. The second part is dedicated to battery electrification, that is, how latest technology is deployed in the specific field of mobility underground (in advanced mining machinery), how lithium as a key battery raw material can be extracted and processed in Europe, and how advanced materials and processing of those are enabling the next generation of batteries, i.e., solid state batteries.

Daniele Pullini, FIAT Research Centre

Innovation challenges in the automotive: opportunities for raw materials beyond 2020

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Abstract

The automotive sector alone provides 12 million jobs and accounts for 4 % of the EU GDP. 2.5 million people are currently involved in the manufacturing of motor vehicles which is equivalent to 8.2 % of the EU employment in manufacturing. Finding new forms of sustainable mobility is fundamental in the transition towards a Green Economy. Whilst the overall greenhouse gas emission decreased in Europe over the last 25 years, those related to transportation has increased over the same period: today, it accounts for almost a quarter of the greenhouse gas emissions in Europe. Thus, the search for novel, environmentally sustainable forms of mobility that are economically feasible has become a key theme in society as well as in academic and industrial research. Apart from reducing pollution emission, key areas that currently experience innovation in the automotive sector include enhanced connectivity, autonomous driving, and safety (i.e., enhanced performance, reliability, predictive modelling and monitoring of material failure). Nevertheless, there are several innovation trends and challenges common to all of them, particularly in the development towards the use of novel lightweight materials, electrification, cost reduction, and the extended use of electronics to enhance connectivity and communication. The use of raw materials and the development of new structural and/or functional materials are at the very heart in each of these innovation fields.

Michel Glotin, Scientific Director, Arkema

Composite Materials for lightweighting, opportunities and challenges 

[read abstract]

Abstract

Some years ago, the EU set new CO2 emission targets for the automotive industry at 95 gr CO2/km for 2020. This initiated a search for lightweighting solutions as it was estimated that gaining 100 Kg weight on a vehicle could contribute to as much as 10 gr of reduced CO2 emitted per km . High sTrength Steel, Aluminium, Magnesium and Organic Composites were the competing materials for steel substitution.
Four main challenges for composite materials to enter the automotive mass market will be discussed: 
- The development of composite manufacturing processes with short cycle times that can meet the typical yearly production targets of the auto industry. 
- The design rules for composite automotive structural parts.
- Recyclability
- Cost 
Examples will be mostly drawn from the "Race-TP" upscaling project and some related KCA projects. 

In very recent years, changing EU regulations have somewhat reduced the interest of car manufacturers for the lightweighting theme, and new priorities have emerged, namely autonomous driving and electrification, with considerable R&D resources being shifted towards these new challenges. However, it will be shown that these targets provide new opportunities for lightweight materials, this will be illustrated in the case of battery packs, for which many lightweighting solutions are now competing and hydrogen tanks where carbon composites are seen today as the preferred option for high pressure vessel manufacturing. 

Claudio Mus, Endurance Overseas

E-Mobility: threat or new opportunities for aluminium?

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Abstract

Lightweight materials like aluminium are currently in high demand for an electric vehicle as low weight equals longer range or a reduction of the battery cost .
Nevertheless the fast developing BEV (Battery Electric Vehicle) segment could lead to an overcapacity in the aluminium casting industry around 2020 – 2025 if production technologies will not evolve to meet needs for larger components with high level of function integration.
Aluminium foundries supplying the ICE powertrain together with peripheral components such as pump housings are in the danger zone. To cope with the additional demand HEV (Hybrid Electric Vehicle) & PHEV ( Plug In Hybrid Electeric Vehicle ) cast aluminum components, some capacity has being recently added in European foundries, some of which will become shortly obsolete as the BEV share increases. 
As a matter of fact BEV vehicles contain much less cast aluminum in the powertrain area compared to ICE, HEV and PHEV . All casting technologies, successfully producing engine components like cylinder block , cylinder head, oilpan , turbochargers , manifolds , and the few needed BEV components (i.e. battery housing & electric engine rotors) require larger size HPDC (High Pressure Die Casting ) machines ( in the range of 4200 tons ) and evolved casting process technologies.
An overview on alloys and combined foundry technologies, suitable to cope with the E-mobility will be given. 

Erik Svedlund, Epiroc

Battery electrification drives mining forward

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

Mining industry is one of the big winners in the transformation to zero emission and electrification. 
The goal to have a fossil free, sustainable society power only from renewable sources offers both challenges and opportunities for our industry. Manufacturers of underground mining equipment are quickly moving towards battery electrification.

Maria Åstrand, Northvolt

A European Lithium refinery producing high grade Lithium for batteries – why, how and what)

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

A number of global political, environmental and technological trends are driving the demand towards a rapid increase in Lithium-ion batteries, turning it to a strategically important domain for both industry and society. The increase in demand puts pressure on raw material supply and processing. The present project aims at validating the technological, economical, legal and social viability of a novel method to produce lithium hydroxide. The objective is to establish a federated European Lithium refinery producing high grade Lithium for battery production within a few years.

Guillame Claude, CEA

Battery activity : Advanced Li metal electrodes

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

Lithium metal is the most promising negative electrode material for high energy post Li-ion technologies, like Lithium Metal Polymer (LMP®) and Lithium/Sulfur (Li/S) batteries. Today, BlueSolutions already produces LMP® cells for both EV and stationary applications. The main goal of ALIM project is to support the commercialization of Critical Raw Materials (CRM)-free innovative battery solutions, by mastering the production process of extra-thin lithium electrodes and boosting the performances of current BlueSolutions LMP® cells. For this purpose, the consortium will benefit from the strong background of Bühler Redex in rolling mills and high precisions applications, as well as from the experience of CEA and Uppsala University in the field of lithium batteries and their characterization.

 
Deep, Intelligent Mining

New technologies for mining and mining under extreme conditions

 

Day 2 - 21 May 2019 - from 14:30 to 17:30 - Auditorium

Despite high availability of minerals and metals in the earth’s crust, declining discovery rate and decreasing ore grade is an issue that the mining industry is facing in the recent decades. Mining often is carried out in harsh conditions, but a smart utilisation of new and innovative technologies can contribute mitigate matters related to workers safety and environmental impact of mining activities. A sustainable, intelligent mining is a vision that will contribute to increase efficiency in mining operation, lower production costs, minimize environmental impact and mining waste, ensuring at the same time safer and more attractive working conditions.

The session will cover different technological aspects, such as automation of mining equipment, innovative methodologies for noise control as well as new education platforms for the miners of the future. Also, the utilisation of platforms for earth observation to mining operation as a way to mine in a smarter fashion will be addressed. Case studies applied to real operations will be showcased.

Stefan Savonen, LKAB

LKAB - on our way to sustainable mining and processing

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Abstract

LKAB is an international and high-tech mining and minerals group that mines and upgrades the unique iron ore of northern Sweden for the global steel market. The group had sales of about SEK 26 billion in 2018 and employs about 4,200 people in 12 countries. Other group business includes industrial minerals, drilling systems, rail transport, rockwork services and property management.

LKAB is on its way to carbon neutrality and the objective is to reach net-zero carbon dioxide emissions by the year 2045. Already today LKAB have cut the emissions from the sintering process down to one fifth of the emissions in 1964. 

LKAB believes in transparency and is the first iron ore mining company to measure and declare carbon footprint and we believe that carbon neutrality is necessary to keep our competitiveness and social license to operate in the future. We know that we can’t reach our objectives by ourselves, strategic partnerships where we work along the whole value chain is needed to succeed. Supportive regulatory framework and funding for innovation and clean low-carbon technologies such as a well-functioning ETS is also needed to be in place for a successful journey. 

The first cornerstones for the transition of LKAB is already in place and we are convinced that the we now have what it takes to start our journey.

Hybrit that aims to make fossil free steel by 2035, achieved by replacing coal with hydrogen and LKAB’s carbon dioxide free pellets as feedstock. 

Sustainable Underground Mining, an industrial development project to set a new world standard for sustainable mining at great depth. LKAB envisions the mine of the future being CO2-free, digitalised and autonomous. 

REEMAP, where LKAB goes beyond iron ore mining to develop an innovative technology for upgrading mine waste from iron ore production with the aim to produce phosphorus and rare earth metals. LKAB is also dedicated to delivering on the circular economy and it is therefore also recycling blast furnace slag from the steel industry for production of Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS).

Åsa Gabrielsson, EPIROC

Automation of Mining Equipment

[read abstract]

Abstract

Underground Mining goes deeper for each year, which stresses the need for safe, sustainable and efficient mining solutions. Deep intelligent mining need to deal with hard facts such as increased rock pressure, higher temperatures, larger infrastructures and longer transports of personnel, material and equipment. Deep intelligent mining also needs to enable safety- and work health requirements as well as efficiency improvements.

SMIFU vision for year 2030 entails No human exposure at the production face, No harmful emissions, No accidents, and Employment satisfaction. Digital transformation is one of the critical enablers to achieve this vision. There is today a larger potential in increasing overall equipment efficiency (utilization factor & systems approach) in the mining industry compared with other heavy industries. We therefore need to leverage on existing technologies as well as continue develop digital maturity and explore new technologies. To our advantage, the enabling technologies in domains such as connectivity, machine automation, data analytics, positioning and traffic solutions are constantly maturing. We have now the capability to secure better insight and optimizing of work operations, material flow and planning systems also in the extreme conditions of underground mining.

Progressive mining companies target a systems approach rather than to continue optimize each different activity. The technical basis is available to integrate real-time data (such as operator, machine and material input) with planning, safety and support systems (positioning, predictive maintenance, consumables management etc) to secure intelligent underground mining.

Marko Antila, VTT

The boost of production with advanced noise protection in harsh mining conditions

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Abstract

Hard rock mechanical cutting is a step forward in challenging underground mining conditions. Instead of drilling and blasting, the continuous process offers several environmental, safety, and economical benefits in harsh conditions. With continuous mining, the blasting noise does not exist, but there are other noise sources. Thus, it is vital to ensure proper noise conditions for the workers. The main noise source is the cutting process. There are also other noteworthy noise sources, such as bolting and dust extraction. The best strategy is to rank and reduce the most significant noise sources. For that, we have developed in RockVader EIT RM project a User Centric Noise Ranking method, where the human experience defines the criteria. The noise reduction is often not possible for the main noise sources. However, it is possible to reduce noise transmission and protect the operators. Due to the high noise levels, superior solutions for noise protection are required, such as cabins and Personal Protection Equipment. Proper noise conditions give several direct and indirect production benefits. The most important benefit is that skilled operators do not get strained and unfocused due to the noise, and costly mistakes are avoided. Furthermore, the advanced noise protection essentially warrants that regulations are fulfilled. Additionally, this makes mine a more attractive working place, which offers a competitive edge, both for the machinery manufacturers and the mine proprietors.

Irene Benito Rodriguez, EIT RawMaterials

RawMatCop: Investigating How Earth Observation Can Boost Mineral and Material Extraction and Environmental Impact Monitoring

Abstract

The RawMatCop Programme 2018 – 2020 (RawMaterials Copernicus) is a collaboration between EIT RawMaterials and the European Commission’s DG GROW Copernicus unit. The RawMatCop Programme was designed as a vehicle to explore how Copernicus/Earth observation data and services can be applied to concrete circular economy case study challenges, particularly in the raw materials sector.

 

The current three-year programme follows and builds on the success of the previous one-year action RawMatCop 2017-18. Moreover, it focuses on delivering more efficient and cost-effective methods to contribute to securing raw materials for Europe aiming at (1) a more efficient and sustainable identification, extraction & mining, and exploitation of raw materials that are crucial for society and industry in Europe as well as (2) improving and optimizing environmental impact monitoring and increasing safety along the raw materials value chain.

 

Copernicus/Earth Observation applications in the raw materials sector are investigated with EIT RawMaterials partners through post-doctoral research projects and research placements in industry/public authority. Examples of the research currently carried out are:

  • The development of a ground monitoring system combining Copernicus Sentinel-1 and seismic observations.

  • The optimization of sampling in stockpiles/tailings, for grade mapping of raw material using geostatistical analysis and Earth observation data.

  • The use of Copernicus data for contamination monitoring and decision support in active mining and rehabilitation.

 

The RawMatCop 2018-2020 Programme shares its results and encourages knowledge transfer and skills dissemination both through yearly Lifelong Learning courses (the RawMatCop Academy) and a User-Forum event scheduled for late 2020. 

[read abstract]

Marc Borbas, Infomine

New strategies for closing the skills gap

[read abstract]

Abstract

Developing graduate engineers from various engineering disciplines (including mining and mineral processing) to the point where they can become competent operators is a perennial challenge.
Production pressures, shifts in core engineering curriculum at colleges and universities, and unprecedented retirement rates have conspired to create a yawning skills gap that threatens the productivity of the entire industry.
In this session, we'll explore a novel, holistic approach to Professional Formation that Edumine is developing alongside Mineralis, Imperial College, Teck, Newmont, and Freeport-McMoRan to close this skills gap in the Mineral Processing discipline and briefly explore how it can be extended across an operation.

[read abstract]

Artur Zakirov, RISE

The IRIS project

Abstract

Hard rock m

[read abstract]

Eija Saari, Outotec

The SERENE project

Abstract

Hard rock m

Advanced Materials: enablers for disruptive innovation

Lightweight design, additive manufacturing, design of new alloys

Day 2 - 21 May 2019 - from 14:30 to 17:30 - Aquamarin

Radical innovation in industries such as the automotive, and in other areas such as energy production and storage, are enabled by the introduction of new and innovative materials, allowing enhanced electronic, optical and mechanical properties, with improved performance and new functionalities. New materials development can also have an important impact in the substitution so-called critical raw materials (http://ec.europa.eu/growth/sectors/raw-materials/specific-interest/critical_en) or toxic substances utilised in the process industry or in consumer’s products.

The session will give some highlights on a number of promising materials technologies such as additive manufacturing, enabling complex materials shapes with improved mechanical properties, and allowing at the same time increased materials efficiency. Printed electronics will also be covered, with its potential to substitute many critical metals with low-costs, easily processable organic materials. Examples of how new magnetic materials are being developed for new application and how graphene holds promises for applications in energy storage will be illustrated.

Philippe Jacques, EMIRI

How Advanced Materials will help EU to reach a Carbon-neutral Society by 2050

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

In November 2018, the European Commission adopted “a strategic long-term vision for a prosperous, modern, competitive and climate neutral economy by 2050 – A Clean Planet for all.”
The strategy shows how Europe can lead the way to climate neutrality by investing into realistic technological solutions, empowering citizens, and aligning action in key areas such as industrial policy, finance, or research – while ensuring social fairness for a just transition.  
A range of existing and novel technologies will be necessary for reaching climate neutrality. These technologies are at different levels of development and deployment. A massive research and innovation effort, built around a coherent strategic research and innovation and investment agenda is needed in the EU within the next two decades to make low and zero-carbon solutions economically viable.
With relevant Industry players and Research & Technology Organisations, EMIRI is proposing technological roadmaps for developing the advanced materials that will enable the required clean energy and clean mobility technologies, while enhancing the competitiveness of EU economy and industry on global markets, securing high quality jobs and sustainable growth in Europe.

Prof. Maurizio Vedani, Politecnico di Milano

Design of new alloys for metal additive manufacturing

[read abstract]

Abstract

Despite the large research and industrial interest on metal additive manufacturing (AM), few specific materials are available on the market for processes such as Selective Laser Melting, Electron Beam Melting, Directed Energy Deposition. 
Al alloys currently used for AM mostly derive from traditional cast alloys, generally featuring poor strength, limited ductility and moderate response to thermal treatments (aging response). However, the large amount of structural parts of potential interest for AM would require a much wider and differentiated range of high-strength Al alloys. 
A similar situation also holds for Fe-based alloys. Current popular steels used for AM of structural parts are limited to AISI 316L stainless steel, Maraging 18Ni300 steel and few others. These steels are selected among those already available on the market due to their good processability (often evaluated by their weldability) but they use a large amount of expensive and critical raw materials (e.g. Cr, Ni, Mo, Co) that are often not really needed. 
A more rational approach is now required to defined smart strategies for the design of novel alloys specifically dedicated to additive manufacturing processes. A more careful selection of alloying elements should be made and compositions, as well as post-process thermal treatments, could be specifically developed to better exploit the peculiar solidification conditions experienced by AM materials.

Taavi Madiberk, Skeleton Technologies

From Sustainable Raw Materials to Solutions Fighting Climate Change

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

Skeleton Technologies is fighting the biggest challenge our society faces: climate change. In this fight, raw materials carry a special significance. Firstly, we use raw materials that are sustainable and sourced from Europe. Secondly, we have risen up the value chain to use these raw materials to provide real solutions to fight climate change.

Michel Glotin, ARKEMA France

Supersmart : Scale-up of smart materials for printed & organic electronics

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

In day to day products, including labels and packaging, there is a rising consumer demand for smart products, that is to say objects able to be part of a digital ecosystem. Embedding sensors and communications technologies while minimizing the environmental impact of these smart products is a key challenge for the future. The major way of achieving this is to work on the base materials of the electronics components to be embedded in, by providing organic materials instead of rare and toxic inorganic ones when applicable. That’s the objective of the SUPERSMART project which will enable the direct printing on paper of sensors, displays and electronics instead of bulk conventional electronics devices. It will make it easy the recyclability of such smart products. Lead by Arkema, a world-wide chemical actor, together with Arjowiggins, providing technical papers for printed electronics, leading technical organizations (CEA, Fraunhofer Institute, Joanneum Research), first-class universities (University de Bordeaux and Lisbon) and innovative SMEs (Luquet & Duranton), the SUPERSMART project aims at scaling up printable smart materials for the smart and recyclable products of the future.

Prof. Oliver Gutfleish, TU Darmstadt

Magnetic refrigeration: from fundamentals to a practical cooling alternative

 

[read abstract]

Abstract

Magnetic materials are key components in energy technologies, robotics, sensors and information technology. Magnets are inseparable from our everyday life. “Green” energy technologies such as wind turbines, electro-mobility and solid state cooling, rely on high performance magnetic materials which have to be available in bulk quantities, at low-cost and with tailored magnetic hysteresis. 
Gas-vapour compression technology for refrigeration, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning has remained unchallenged for more than 120 years. Energy spent for domestic cooling is expected to outreach that for heating worldwide over the course of the twenty-first century. There is a huge demand for a smarter, more flexible and more efficient cooling technology. Magnetic refrigeration could be that alternative working without gas-based refrigerants. 
The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is the reversible temperature change of a magnetic material upon application and removal of a magnetic field. I will introduce the basics of the MCE, illustrate its great potential in magnetic refrigeration, will derive the required materials´ attributes of a magnetic heat exchanger, give guidelines for material selection and will look into the challenges of developing an efficicient prototype. I will address the criticality of strategic metals in magnetic cooling, their potential for substitution and how the ecological footprint of the magnetic fridge can be improved by using recycled magnets.

 
"Stepping Up International Cooperation" by FORAM Network

Day 2 - 21 May 2019 - from 14:30 to 17:30 - Room Rubin

The project Towards a World Forum on Raw Materials (FORAM) (2016-2018) has set up a global platform of international experts and stakeholders that aims at strengthening international cooperation among G20 Member countries as well as other third countries active in the extraction, processing and recycling of mineral raw materials. The project supports the implementation of the Raw Materials Initiative and the Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Raw Materials. Together with its Advisory Board and the established platform of international experts and stakeholders the FORAM Stakeholders Network has got inputs from more than 200 decision-makers and thought leaders in the sector worldwide.

The following priorities for strengthening international cooperation worldwide have been identified:

• Innovation, security of supply and growth

• Resource-efficiency, environmental and social aspects

• Policies, legal and financial frameworks

• International cooperation and outreach

• Research, capacity building and education

  

The EIT Raw Materials Summit session on “Stepping up International Cooperation” will focus on showcasing best practices in regulatory and financial frameworks for implementing raw materials policies, on national, regional and international levels, not only on primary raw materials but also on secondary raw materials and the circular economy. Promising ways and means for developing public awareness, acceptance and trust (“social development license to operate”), by means of communication, education and capacity building will be addressed.

 

The session will take stock of international initiatives for establishing UN-based conventions or international regulations, on supply-chain transparency, social and environmental standards and policy frameworks, as well as certification schemes to improve responsible mining and sourcing practices, and the potential of raw material sectors to contribute to the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Progress made will be reported to the upcoming World Resources Forum 2019, to be held in Geneva, October 22-24, 2019 as well as to the Raw Materials Week, to be held in Brussels, November 18-22, 2019.

Stefan Bringezu, Uni Kassel

Towards a standard protocol of the environmental performance of materials

[read abstract]

Abstract

A standard indicator set could report the “cradle-to-material” footprints with regard to primary material extraction, land use, water use, and energy consumption. The data can be used to assess planned and operating mining and recycling operations; support LCA of products and underpin related labelling (e.g. EPDs); and contribute to the measurement of resource productivity of whole countries. Existing data bases can be used for reference, and be updated and/or extended with primary data. International cooperation is required to develop and agree on a standard reporting format, and to ensure appropriate data quality.

Rokhaya Samba, Ministry of Mine and Geology, Senegal

PanAfGeo Project, A Pan African support to the EGS-OAGS partnership

[read abstract]

Abstract

“Pan-African Support to the EuroGeoSurveys-Organisation of African Geological Surveys (EGS-OAGS) Partnership” (PanAfGeo) is a project which supports the training of geoscientific staff from African Geological Surveys through the development of an innovative training programme. 
Addressed to the Organisation of African Geological Surveys (OAGS) and its member organisations as well as relevant governmental bodies such as mining authorities and geological research bodies (e.g. universities, research centres), the project aims to increase African-owned geological knowledge and skills for sustainable mineral exploitation and related infrastructures, and natural disaster prevention and mitigation. It is divided in 8 work-packages dealing with various geoscientific skills and driving 42 training sessions planned in English, French and Portuguese for 1200 trainees.
By developing this ambitious Pan-African project, this cooperation will strengthen the geological sector in Africa, and will therefore represent a step forward in the political commitment to the development of EU-Africa cooperation in this area. 
PanAfGeo is co-funded by the European Commission (Directorate-General of Development and International Cooperation) and by a Consortium of 12 European Geological Surveys coordinated by the French Geological Survey (BRGM).

Marcin Sadowski, European Commission - Executive Agency for SMEs

International cooperation in H2020 raw materials projects

[read abstract]

Abstract

The current EU framework programme for Research and Innovation, Horizon 2020, is known for being open to the world. This is especially true for the raw materials part of the programme, where in most cases international Cooperation is encouraged. Organisations in some 130 developing countries are eligible for EU funding, and organisation from other countries can be exceptionally funded if their participation is deemed essential. Many non-EU countries have jointly agreed co-funduing mechanisms.
66 projects have been selected since the start of Horizon 2020, for a total EU funding of 365 million euro; we will reniew their outcomes within the ra materials international cooperation, both in terms of technical and non-technical aspects.

Asja Mrotzek-Bloess, Clausthal University of Technology

International cooperation in research and university education

[read abstract]

Abstract

International cooperation is one of the key elements of successful research but also university education in the research focus area “raw materials supply and resource efficiency” of Clausthal University of Technology. Besides our European and international networks such as the EIT Raw Materials, the EIP on Raw Materials, the European Rock Extraction Group, the Society of Mining Professors or our networks based on European funded projects, our international activities are focused on close cooperation with partners in China, South America, Southern Africa and Kazakhstan.
Challenges in Circular Economy, Post-Mining, Health, Safety and Environment in Mining as well as Sustainable Sourcing of Primary and Secondary Raw Materials are important topics that cannot be solved by German or European initiatives alone. In line with SDG 17, we strengthen our international partnerships to contribute to these global challenges. Against our thematic background, we advance our partnerships in research as well as in university education adapted to our partners and the circumstances in the partner countries. 
The talk will give an overview of our different approaches to improve international cooperation showing our experiences in: Research projects (Recovery of rare earth elements from tailing sites or production residues in Brazil), Educational cooperation (Exchange of lecturers with China and Brazil, Development of joint courses) and our Master Course on Mining Engineering.

Peder Jensen, International Resource Panel

Mineral Resource Governance in the 21th century

Abstract

 •        Successful delivery of the SDG and the implementation of the Paris Agreement and big infrastructure projects require clean technologies relying on metals and minerals in vast quantities (e.g. metals and minerals for low-carbon energy infrastructure, electric vehicles, digitalization, sand for infrastructure).

•        Metal substitution and recycling will contribute to sustaining supply, but recent studies (e.g. World Bank, UNEP International resources panel) show that over the next 2-3 decades, the extractive industry will struggle to meet the demand for raw materials.

•        At the same time, the extraction of metal and mineral has important impacts on water, land and ecosystems. The extraction, processing and waste disposal often cause air pollution, biodiversity loss and the contamination of groundwater and surface water.

•     

Martine Rohn-Brossard, Swiss Federal Office for the Environment

Mineral Resource Governance

[read abstract]

Abstract

 •        Successful delivery of the SDG and the implementation of the Paris Agreement and big infrastructure projects require clean technologies relying on metals and minerals in vast quantities (e.g. metals and minerals for low-carbon energy infrastructure, electric vehicles, digitalization, sand for infrastructure).

•        Metal substitution and recycling will contribute to sustaining supply, but recent studies (e.g. World Bank, UNEP International resources panel) show that over the next 2-3 decades, the extractive industry will struggle to meet the demand for raw materials.

•        At the same time, the extraction of metal and mineral has important impacts on water, land and ecosystems. The extraction, processing and waste disposal often cause air pollution, biodiversity loss and the contamination of groundwater and surface water.

•        The topic is now on the top of the international environmental political agenda. Indeed at the Fourth United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA 4, March 2019), the international community recognized the importance of the issue and adopted a resolution on mineral resource governance – submitted by Mexico and co-sponsored by Switzerland - that mandates UNEP to collect sustainable practices, identify knowledge gaps and options for implementation strategies and report to UNEA5 (2021).

•        Multistakeholders fora like the Word Resources Forum (Geneva, 22-24 October 2019) are very good opportunities to discuss this subject in preparation of further discussions at UNEA 5.

Ferdinand Maubrey, RCS Global Group

The Cobald Supply Chain: An Example for the Limits of Cooperation?

Abstract

Cobalt is a mineral that is under a lot of international scrutiny at the moment due to the fact that it is mined primarily in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where advocacy NGOs have alerted to human rights abuses associated with cobalt mining, and its importance for lithium-ion batteries in all of our consumer electronics and electric vehicles.

 

As a result, electronics and car companies have started conducting significant human rights due diligence on their cobalt supply chains and are currently looking for solutions to mitigate human rights risks at the source of their supply chains, including audits against standards developed by these downstream companies. The experience from the 'conflict minerals' debate, however, is that such efforts need to be cooperative and aligned with other stakeholders exposed to the issue, including Chinese midstream companies (cathode producers, refiners), Congolese mining companies, civil society organizations, international advocacy NGOs, donors, international organizations, industry associations, and governments in the DRC, the United States, and Europe.

 

If not, there is a risk that risk mitigation efforts become playing fields for geopolitics and economic interests and that responsible sourcing becomes a competitive space rather than one that contributes to improving the production conditions on the ground.

Angelika Brechelmacher, MinPol GmbH

Global Mineral Policy